Tag: stablecoins

1
FATF report to the G20 on stablecoins
2
The OCC’S ANPR on Digital Banking: Is this a Harbinger for Digital and Open Banking in the US?
3
Regulating Stablecoins: Certain Stablecoins are Now Subject to the Texas Money Services Act

FATF report to the G20 on stablecoins

By Giovanni Campi

Stablecoins have attracted much regulatory attention lately. The G7 working group on stablecoins, the International Organization of Securities Commissions, the Financial Stability Board (FSB) and the European Commission are among the international institutions pressing for global stablecoins regulation. The overarching regulatory problems they all identify are:

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The OCC’S ANPR on Digital Banking: Is this a Harbinger for Digital and Open Banking in the US?

By Judie Rinearson, John ReVeal and Stan Ragalevsky

The office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) on June 3, 2020, focusing on digital banking activities. Typically such ANPRs are a precursor to new federal regulation; following collection of data from the industry and other interested parties, the OCC may propose new regulations by issuing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking within 6-12 months.  Responses to the ANPR are due on August 3, 2020.

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Regulating Stablecoins: Certain Stablecoins are Now Subject to the Texas Money Services Act

By Daniel S. Cohen

On January 2, the Texas Department of Banking (“DoB”) updated Supervisory Memorandum – 1037 (“Guidance”) which provides guidance regarding the application of the Texas Money Services Act (the “Act”) to virtual currencies.  First issued on April 3, 2014, the Guidance divides virtual currency into two categories: centralized and decentralized.

Centralized virtual currencies are virtual currencies “created and issued by a specified source” that “rely on an entity with some form of authority or control over the currency”. Decentralized virtual currencies, on the other hand, are virtual currencies that do not have an administrator or a central repository. 

Stablecoins are considered decentralized virtual currencies, provided they do not have an administrator or central repository.  According to the Guidance, whether the Act applies to centralized virtual currencies requires a case-by-case determination.  As for decentralized virtual currencies, the Guidance states that the Act only applies when sovereign currency is involved, and only in certain cases, because decentralized virtual currencies do not constitute money or monetary value. 

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